Haciendo Caras/Making Faces: Connecting Identity, Resistance, Art, and Spirituality

Ausgabe #8
November 2019
Download PDF
 
 
Looking Back Forward_Quip Nayr, 2017/2018, Berlin/ Wien. 
Diverse Textiienl, Wasserfarbe, 30x62cm
© Verena Melgarejo Weinandt
Looking Back Forward_Quip Nayr, 2017/2018, Berlin/Wien. 
Diverse Textilien, Fotografie, 37x37cm
© Verena Melgarejo Weinandt
Looking Back Forward_Quip Nayr, 2017/2018, Berlin/Wien. 
Diverse Textilien, Wasserfarbe, 37×62
© Verena Melgarejo Weinandt
Looking Back Forward_Quip Nayr, 2017/2018, Berlin/Wien. 
Diverse Textilien, Fotografie, 57x43cm
© Verena Melgarejo Weinandt
Looking Back Forward_Quip Nayr, 2017/2018, Berlin/Wien. 
Diverse Textilien, Wasserfarbe,  52x79cm
© Verena Melgarejo Weinandt

 

“Art is a struggle between the personal voice and language, with its apparatuses of culture and ideologies, and art mediums with their genre laws—the human voice trying to outshout a roaring waterfall. Art is a sneak attack while the giant sleeps, a sleight of hands when the giant is awake, moving so quick they can do their deed before the giant swats them. Our survival depends on being creative.”11Gloria Anzaldúa: Making Face, Making Soul. Haciendo Caras: Creative and Critical Perspectives by Feminists of Color. (San Francisco 1990), xxiv.

 
I have been deeply inspired in various ways by the introductory text for the anthology Making Face, Making Soul; Haciendo Caras: Creative and Critical Perspectives by Women of Color by Gloria Anzaldúa. In the genealogy of my reading of Anzaldúa, this text was the first one I read in depth, and since then it has continuously informed my artistic and curatorial work. On the following passages, I intend to share how the concept of Haciendo Caras/Making Faces relates to art and creativity, hoping it will be an inspiration for others who have felt that the institutions of knowledge and art production are not capable of understanding or are not focusing enough on the connections between knowledge and art production with non-European and non-Eurocentric visions, and in connection with knowledge production that includes spirituality, the body, ancestral knowledge, feelings, experience, nature, and so forth. I want to briefly recall my first encounter with this text because in my opinion, it shows how we can relate to texts in different ways, and how reading and learning are not only about the capacity to access information and make rational conclusions, but about how they can be a transformative and empowering experience.
 
In 2016, I was writing my thesis about a white feminist art production that I had been modelling for. Because I was taking part in an art project that I thought to be feminist—in a way that it would deal consciously and carefully with the representation of people of color and indigenous people—I agreed to be photographed wearing only underwear without knowing exactly what this work was about or how these pictures would be used in the future. Only years later did I learn that I had been exhibited as a paper doll that people in the exhibition were invited to dress and undress and that the images of my body in underwear had been printed in a newspaper and on postcards advertising the exhibition.
 
The motivation of my thesis back then was to find empowerment through the analysis and critique of that specific artwork and its definitions of feminist art, using arguments based on the criticism of white feminism from feminists of color in the German-speaking context, and from Abya Yala (Latin America)22At that moment I had already been familiar with Gloria Anzaldúa, but only with her text “La conciencia de la mestiza: Towards a New Consciousness”. This chapter from her book Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (Anzaldúa, Gloria: Borderlands La Frontera: The New Mestiza, San Francisco 2007 [1987] is, in my perception, her most-read text in the German-speaking academic context, specifically within the field of Gender Studies. Many feminists of color such as Fatima El-Tayeb, Maria do Mar Castro Varela, Encarnación Gutiérrez Rodriguez, Jin Haritaworn, and others have criticized the absence of perspectives within German-speaking academia from feminist of color for many years. „Doch wo bleiben die theoretischen Auseinandersetzungen in der Queerbewegung mit dem Schwarzen Feminismus und den Schriften von Migrantinnen? Die Auseinandersetzung mit Konzepten wie dem Gloria Anzaldúas oder Cherrie Moragas ‚Queer of Color‘, die Rassismus, Kolonialismus und Antisemitismus als konstitutive Bestandteile der westlichen Gesellschaft betrachten, findet bis heute kaum Beachtung.“ (Encarnación Gutiérrez Rodríguez; María do Mar Castro Varela: “Queer Politics im Exil und in der Migration”, in: Queering Demokratie: Sexuelle Politiken, (Berlin, 2000). Abridged and edited version by migrazine.at. URL: http://migrazine.at/artikel/queer-politics-im-exil-und-der-migration [accessed March 2, 2019]) This is not the place to further elaborate on the critiques of academics, social movements, associations, and activists in German-speaking countries who are queer/feminists of color. But writing about Gloria Anzaldúa in this context means acknowledging that I am neither the first nor the only person in academia who has written about her and that writing about her and referencing her work is part of a larger political struggle by feminists/lesbians/queers/trans*people and women* of color against a genealogy of a white feminism.. I analyzed photography and the postcard as mediums of oppression in colonial and imperialist undertakings, but most importantly, for the purpose of this article, I searched for empowerment in my own actions. During the photo shoot, I already felt very uncomfortable. At that moment I did not articulate this impression through words, but through faces. I made faces to the photographer, half as a joke, half resisting the photograph she wanted to create, in which my body had to stand still and firm, without any movement. In my thesis, I was searching for a way to argue and articulate that these gestures and faces were expressing resistance. Although I wasn’t able to express my discomfort through words at that very moment, my body did express this discomfort, or, more specifically, my face did. Gloria Anzaldúa’s concept of Haciendo Caras/Making Faces allowed me to find arguments for this resistance and to gain a deeper understanding of how internalized oppressions can be dismantled. It also helped me to relate my gestures of Making Faces during the photo shoot to my creative work and understand the production of my art work as part of a larger process of empowerment.
 
Gloria Anzaldúa wrote about this concept in the introductory text for this anthology. It consists of seventy-two texts by sixty-three authors (including Anzaldúa). Anzaldúa writes in the introduction that, after having published the anthology This Bridge Called My Back:Writing by Radical Women of Color together with Cherríe Moraga, there was still a lack of publications of texts written by women of color. The anthology Haciendo Caras/Making Faces evolved as a reader for a class she gave in 1988 at the University of California Santa Cruz, USA. After the publication of This Bridge Called My Back, Haciendo Caras/Making Faces was an attempt to focus on discussions among women of color: “I wanted us to be talking to each other more.”33AnaLouise Keating: “Writing, Politics, and las Lesberadas: Platicando con Gloria Anzaldúa”, in: Chicana Leadership: The Frontiers Reader, edited by Yolanda Flores Niemann Yolanda, Susan H. Armitage, Patricia Hart, and Karen Weathermon. (Lincoln, 2002), 122
 
Anzaldúas einführender Text zum Sammelband beginnt mit einer kurzen Beschreibung ihres Konzeptes der masks and interfaces/caras y mascaras.44Anzaldúa 1990, xv-xvi. Wenn ich Texte lese, geschieht es meist automatisch, dass ich mir in dieser Sprache Notizen mache, die ich dann anschließend zu einem Text zusammenfüge. In diesem Fall waren meine Notizen auf Deutsch und Englisch. Indem ich die Absätze in den jeweiligen Sprachen belassen habe, in denen sie entstanden sind, möchte ich meinen Denkprozess sichtbar machen, der bei mir (wie auch bei vielen anderen Menschen) in verschiedenen Sprachen stattfindet.
„Until I can take pride in my language, I cannot take pride in myself.“ (Anzaldúa 1987, 81)
Gesichter zu machen oder Grimassen zu ziehen, wird hier als Widerstandsakt und Reaktion auf verschiedene Formen der Diskriminierungen und Gewalt, die Women of Color erleben, beschrieben. „For me, hacienda caras has the added connotation of making gestos subversivos, political subversive gestures, the piercing look that questions or challenges, the look that says, ‘Don’t walk all over me,’ the one that says, ‘Get out of my face’.”55Anzaldúa 1990: xv. Das Gesicht wird hier als Ort der Vulnerabilität definiert, als ein besonders exponiertes Körperteil, in dem unsere Erfahrungen und internalisierten Verhaltensmuster Ausdruck finden und sich manifestieren. Das Gesicht als Sprachrohr entwickelt einen Katalog von Masken, die eine chamäleonartige Anpassung an Situationen ermöglichen. Durch die wiederholte Performance dieser Gesichter/Masken werden sie zu internalisierten Handlungsoptionen. Gesten, Reaktionen und Verhaltensweisen werden Teil von und konstruieren Identität und sind damit untrennbar mit der eigenen Selbstwahrnehmung verbunden. „’Making Face’ is my metaphor for constructing one’s identity.“66Anzaldúa 1990, xvi.
Dieser Moment, in dem sich die Identität durch das Tragen von Masken bzw. das Reproduzieren von Handlungsmustern, die in Reaktion auf gewaltvolle Momente entstehen, prägt und formiert, birgt gleichzeitig die Gefahr, sich in dieser Performance von Masken und Rollen zu verlieren. Widerstand und das Brechen mit diesen Masken werden nach Anzaldúa durch die Existenz der interfaces möglich. Anzaldúa verwendet hier einen Begriff aus dem Kontext des Nähens. Mit interfaces77Interface wird im Deutschen (wenn nicht vom Nähen gesprochen wird) mit Schnittstelle, Oberfläche oder auch Grenzfläche übersetzt. Alle diese Übersetzungen beschreiben sehr gut die Eigenschaften, die Anzaldúa diesem Ort des Dazwischens zuschreibt; es ist ein Ort der Überschneidungen, des Zusammenkommens, ein produktiver oder aktiver Grenzbereich. Im Gegensatz zur Lücke, die eine Leere impliziert, geht es hier um die Notwendigkeit der Existenz dieses Zwischenraums. werden Stoffe bezeichnet, die nicht sichtbar unter die sichtbaren Stoffe genäht werden, um diesen Halt und Stabilität zu geben. Auch hier wählt Anzaldúa die Position des Zwischenraums, der einerseits von Fragilität, andererseits von Stärke geprägt ist. Diese nicht sichtbare Schicht im Grenzbereich zwischen der Haut und der äußeren Lage bildet einen (Zwischen-)Raum, von dem aus Handlungsoptionen möglich werden. Die Metapher der interfaces produziert eine bildliche Darstellung der Verortung von Selbstermächtigung und Widerstand durch die selbstbestimmte Repräsentation der eigenen Identität. Dabei werden nach außen sichtbare Darstellungen des Selbst zum Beispiel auf Entstehung und Funktion, ihre Verbindung zu Traumata, ihre Rolle als Widerstandsstrategie oder ihre Überschneidung mit der eigenen Selbstwahrnehmung untersucht. Von den interfaces ausgehend können die Außenschichten/die Masken, die Reaktionen auf Bilder und Erinnerungen, die schmerzhafte Erfahrungen beinhalten und symbolisieren, aufgebrochen werden.88Anzaldúa 1990, xvi. Selbstbestimmung und Ermächtigung finden durch die Produktion eigener Masken statt. Nach Anzaldúa besteht die Notwendigkeit dieser selbstbestimmten Identitätsformierung in der Möglichkeit einer differenzierten Repräsentation in der Intersektionalitäten Ausdruck finden können. Der Zwischenraum oder Grenzraum bildet einen Raum, in dem vielfältige, teils widersprüchliche Einflüsse miteinander existieren und sich manifestieren können. To act within that liminal space or to produce these own faces is what Anzaldúa defines as a creative process wherein the production of images comes into play:

 
“By sending our voices, visuals and visions outwards into the world, we alter the walls and make them a framework for new windows and doors. We transform the pozos, apertures, barrancas, abismos that we are forced to speak from. Only then can we make a home out of the cracks.”99Anzaldúa 1990, xxv. Viele Texte von Gloria Anzaldúa sind mehrsprachig und ohne Übersetzungen verfasst. Wie sehr sie dadurch mit akademischen Definitionen von Wissensproduktion brach, zeigt sich auch darin, wie unüblich es ist, wenn einzelne Begriffe einer anderen Sprache nicht übersetzt werden. Ich habe gelernt, diesen Moment des Nichtverstehens einzelner Vokabeln auch als Teil einer Leseerfahrung zu deuten, die uns darauf hinweist, dass nicht alles Wissen immer zugänglich ist oder sein will, dass die Entstehung von Wissen immer auch lokal verortet ist und kontextspezifisches Wissen nicht universell verständlich ist, dass die eigene Perspektive immer auch eine limitierte ist, dass unterschiedliche Sprachkenntnisse (in diesem Fall zum Beispiel des Englischen, Spanischen, Tex-Mex, Spanglish oder auch von Vokabeln aus dem Nahuatl) unterschiedlich viel Aufwand erfordern, sich einem Text anzunähern und dieser Aufwand und diese Differenzen auch mitgelesen werden können.
 

Visuals are defined as part of the elements needed to inhabit that liminal space, the borderlands, but Anzaldúa places them in a larger set of visual production, such as visions, projections, and imagination. Anzaldúa conceptualizes creativity in a broader sense, talking not only about writing as an artistic praxis but talking about creative expressions in general that are capable of being “acts of deliberate and desperate determination to subvert the status quo” (xxiv). The way Anzaldúa frames the production of images and art as a way to produce knowledge has been an influence to many artists.1010Imayna Caceres and I were able to present several artistic positions in dialogue with Anzaldúa’s definition and perception of knowledge production in the exhibition “Back/s Together,” which was presented in 2018 at The Austrian Association of Women Artists (VBKÖ) Vienna
 
Anzaldúa describes art1111I do not intend to write a complete list here; rather, I want to express my focus for this article.

  • as a way not only to express but also to create identity
  • as a spiritual process and one of healing
  • as a coping strategy and a strategy of survival
  • as a way to resist and to dismantle racist and discriminatory representation propagated by a dominant culture
  • as a way to let go of the limits of institutionalized art definitions and to let influences of different cultural backgrounds, everyday life, experiences,and much more become part of artistic expression

 
In Anlehnung an das indigene Konzept der Nahua1212Mit dem Überbegriff Nahua lassen sich verschiedene indigene Gruppen bezeichnen, die Nahuatl sprechen. Ein Großteil lebt auf dem Territorium des heutigen Mexikos. bezeichnet der kreative Formierungsprozess eigener Gesichter und Masken (also die Produktion selbstbestimmter Identitätsdarstellungen und Bilder) auch das Zusammenbringen von Körper und Seele, was Anzaldúa mit „making soul“ bezeichnet. Sie bezieht sich hier auf den Gott Moyocoyani, der in der aztekischen Poesie und Philosophie als „the one that acts by itself with absolute freedom“ oder „the one who invents himself“1313Manuel Aguilar-Moreno: Handbook to Life in the Aztec World, (New York, 2006), 145. beschrieben wird. Mit teilweise schmerzhaften Erfahrungen, Bildern oder Projektionen umzugehen und zu brechen und eigene Bilder und damit eigene Gesichter/Identitäten herzustellen, ist nach Anzaldúa also auch ein spiritueller Prozess.

 
“Inherent in the creative act is a spiritual, psychic component—one of spiritual excavation, of (ad)venturing into the inner void, extrapolating meaning from it and sending it out into the world. To do this kind of work requires the total person—body, soul, mind and spirit.”1414Anzaldúa 1990, xxiv.

 
AnaLouise Keating bezeichnet den Zusammenhang, den Anzaldúa zwischen kreativen und spirituellen Prozessen aufzeigt, als „shaman aesthetics“1515Gloria Anzaldúa: „Haciendo caras, una entrada“, in: The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader, edited by Keating, Ana Lousie and The Gloria E. Anzaldúa Literary
Trust. (Durham, 2007 [1987]), 124
– ein Konzept das den Zusammenhang zwischen Identität, Kunst/Kreativität und spirituellen Prozessen noch einmal mehr verdeutlicht. Anzaldúa selber charakterisiert ihre Arbeit an dem Sammelband This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color als diejenige einer „poet-shaman“1616Anzaldúa 2009, 121., derenFähigkeit es ist, „illness“1717Ebd. zu erkennen, die Women of ColorLeid zufügt und die sich in Form von Metaphern zeigt: „All Mexicans are lazy and shiftless is an example of a metaphor that resists change. This metaphor has endured as fact even though we all know it is a lie. It will endure until we replace it with a new metaphor, one that we believe in both consciously and unconsciously.“1818Anzaldúa 2009, 122 (Herv. i. O.). Die Verbindung von kreativen und spirituellen Prozessen ermöglicht erst Identitätskonstruktionen, die diesen Metaphern Alternativen entgegenstellen. Keating gelingt es in ihrem Fokus auf Anzaldúas Arbeit, den Kern oder Motor nicht nur von Anzaldúas Konzepten des Haciendo Caras/Making Faces oder der shaman aesthetics, sondern ihrer Wissensproduktion allgemein aufzuzeigen.Wissensproduktion dient der Selbstheilung: „If we’re lucky we create, like the shaman, images that induce altered states of consciousness conductive to self-healing.“1919Ebd. Der Prozess der Selbstheilung verfolgt dabei nicht allein individuelle Ziele. Gloria Anzaldúa hat in ihrem Schaffen mehrere Methoden entwickelt, die individuelle Prozesse, Erlebnisse und Perspektiven strukturell verankern und trotz der großen Nähe zu subjektiven Prozessen gesamtgesellschaftliche Mechanismen aufzeigen.2020Siehe zum Beispiel ihr Konzept der „Autohistoria“, Anzaldúa 2009, 319 Auch der Entwicklung von und Arbeit an  Bildern und Sprache spricht Anzaldúa die Möglichkeit zu, Wissen zu kollektivieren und damit auch eine Heilung kollektiver Wunden zu ermöglichen.

 
If we’ve done our job well we may give others access to a language and images with which they can articulate/express pain, confusion, joy, and other experiences thus far experienced only on an inarticulated emotional level. From our own and our people’s experiences, we will try to create images and metaphors that will give us a handle on the numinous, a handle on the faculty for self-healing, one that may cure the depressed spirit, the frightened soul.2121Anzaldúa 2009, 122.

 Individuelle und kollektive Subjektivierungsprozesse sind bei Anzaldúa nicht voneinander zu trennen. Subjektivität besteht oder kann nach Anzaldúa nur im Zusammenhang mit einem Kollektiv entstehen. Im Kontext von Haciendo Caras/Making Faces werden aus den einzelnen Stimmen und Schriften von Women of Color kollektive Narrative erzeugt und sichtbar.

Die Philosophin Christa Davis Acampora bezeichnet in Bezug auf Anzaldúas Konzept des Haciendo Caras/Making Faces die kollektive Herstellung von neuen Metaphern auch als ästhetische Transformation2222Christa Davis Acampora: “On Unmaking and Remaking, An Introduction (with obvious affection for Gloria Anzaldúa)”, in: Unmaking Race, Remaking Soul: Trasformative Aesthetics and the Practice of Freedom, edited by Davis Acampora, Christa, L. Cotton, Angela, 1–17. (New York, 2007), 2..

 
In the course of struggles organized around racial identity, gender identity, or class identity, aesthetics potentially plays an important role, both in how people cope with experiences of oppression and discrimination, and also how they appropriate their sense of themselves and their aspirations from within those struggles, out of those conditions.2323Daniel Blue: Interview with Christa Davis Acampora, in: Nietzsche Circle 2007, S. 18, http://www.nietzschecircle.com/ACAMPORA_INTERVIEW_DB.pdf [accessed February 15, 2019].

 Anzaldúa selbst betont, dass Ästhetik in diesem Schaffen neuer Masken eine wichtige Rolle spielt, dieses aber nicht darauf reduziert werden darf: „Creative acts are forms of political activism employing definite aesthetic strategies for resisting dominant cultural norms and are not merely aesthetic exercises.“2424Anzaldúa 1990, xxiv. Davis Acampora wiederum spricht von einer „aesthetic agency“, um die Verbindung zwischen Handlungsmacht und der transformativen Rolle von Ästhetik herzustellen. Der kollektive Charakter in der Produktion von Ästhetik ergibt sich durch symbolische Formen, die in der Lage sind, Wissen zu erwerben und weiterzugeben.2525Vgl. Davis Acampora 2007, 5. Ästhetische Verschiebungen symbolischer Repräsentationen beeinflussen allerdings nicht nur unser Wissen, sondern ebenso die Vermittlung und den Erwerb solcher Gefühle und Fähigkeiten, die sie “aesthetic sensibilities”2626Ebd. nennt. Diese ästhetischen Empfindungs- oder Wahrnehmungsfähigkeiten produzieren, betont Davis Acampora, eine andere Wahrnehmung, ein anderes Sehen. Damit erweitert sie die Definition des Sehens; es ist nicht auf visuelle Aspekte beschränkt, sondern meint ein umfassenderes Wahrnehmen. Auch wenn Davis Acampora hier nicht explizit von spirituellem Wissen spricht, ermöglicht diese Definition oder Erweiterung dennoch den Raum, um auch diese Form von Wissen mitzudenken. „For many of the authors here, such ‘seeing’ grounds a different cognitive perspective, a different way of understanding the world, one’s place within it, and how the world might possibly be negotiated and reorganized.”2727Ebd. Davis Acamporas Definition von Ästhetik als handelnde und Sensibilität produzierende Agentin, die in der Lage ist, Machtverhältnisse zu artikulieren und damit zu brechen und gleichzeitig als Akteurin in einem kollektiven Setting zu verstehen, erscheint mir eine sinnvolle Ergänzung zu Anzaldúa, die sich dem Begriff von Ästhetik nicht tiefergehend widmet.
 
Ich möchte noch einmal auf meine eigene künstlerische Arbeit zurückkommen, ohne den Anspruch zu verfolgen, ein resümierendes Ende für diesen Artikel zu schreiben. Eingeladen wurde ich zu diesem Text ursprünglich, um das Konzept Haciendo Caras/Making Faces zu erläutern, auf das sich mein künstlerischer Beitrag für dieses Onlinemagazin, Looking Back Forward_Quip Nayr, unter anderem bezieht.
Der Genealogie meiner Auseinandersetzung, Begegnung und Arbeit mit dem Konzept Haciendo Caras/Making Faces folgend habe ich den Text mit meiner wissenschaftlichen Diplomarbeit2828Melgarejo Weinandt, Verena: Grimmassen ziehen- Masken aufbrechen- Strukturen freilegen: Fragmentarische Analyse einer Fotocollage. Akademie der bildenen Künste Wien 2016 (unveröffentlichte Diplomarbeit). begonnen und beende ihn mit einem Bezug auf meine künstlerische Arbeit. Ich verstehe Anzaldúas Definition von Ästhetik und Kunst als Teil von spirituellen Prozessen, individuellen wie kollektiven Identitätsformierungen, die Arbeit mit und die Produktion von Bildern als möglicherweise heilenden, transformativen und widerständigen Akt. Das ist ein Wissen, das es nicht nur zu verstehen, sondern zu erfahren gilt. Meine künstlerische Arbeit Looking Back Forward_Quip Nayr ist demnach ein Versuch, diese Prozesse nachzuvollziehen und auszuloten, für mich erfahrbar zu machen. Ich lade alle Leser_innen dieses Artikels dazu ein, diesen letzten Abschnitt gemeinsam mit meinen Bildern zu ‚lesen’:
 
Die Textilien, auf denen ich meine fotografische Arbeit und Texte reproduziert habe, bestehen aus verschiedenen Materialien, die für textile Produkte als interfaces, zu Deutsch Einlagematerial, verwendet werden. In mehreren meiner künstlerischen Arbeiten verwende ich diese Textile, die ich mit verschiedenen organischen Substanzen färbe (zum Beispiel mit Kaffee oder schwarzem Tee), um sie farblich verschiedenen Nuancen meiner eigenen Hautfarbe anzugleichen. Die Textile sind, inspiriert durch das Konzept von Anzaldúa, zu einem Material geworden, das ich als Symbol für Haut verwende, wodurch die Arbeit immer auch ein Selbstporträt darstellt – ich kehre quasi Zwischenschichten meiner eigenen Erscheinung nach außen und symbolisiere damit Formierungsprozesse der eigenen Identität. Durch die Überlagerung verschiedener Schichten und die Exponierung von Nähten und Fäden möchte ich den Charakter der Schichtung und Konstruktion aufrechterhalten.
Die Fläche, die durch das Vernähen verschiedener Stoffschichten miteinander entsteht, ermöglicht mir außerdem, andere Medien zu inkludieren, wie in diesem Fall Text und Fotografien, die Teil der Textile werden. Es entsteht eine Collage von verschiedenen Elementen, deren teils fragile, teils stabile Verbindungen eine gemeinsame Konstruktion ergeben, die von Fragmentierung und Wandel gekennzeichnet ist.
Auch in der fotografischen Reproduktion meines eigenen Körpers werden durch die Mehrfachbelichtungen Zwischenräume und Schichten meines Porträts sichtbar. Die in dieser Arbeit inkludierten Textfragmente kommen aus verschiedenen Notizen, Texten und Gedichten, die ich in der Zeit der Produktion dieser Arbeit verfasst habe. Einzelne Sätze und Worte sind daraus entnommen und wurden neu zusammengesetzt. Auch hier fokussiere ich mich auf den Raum, der zwischen den Zeilen entsteht, und die Assoziationen, die sich durch die Fragmentierung und Zusammensetzung einzelner Textelemente ergeben.
Diese Arbeit ist im Kontext meiner Auseinandersetzung mit Berlin, der Stadt in der ich aufgewachsen bin, entstanden und geht der Frage nach, was es für mich bedeutet, an einen Ort zurück zu kehren, in dem ich aufgewachsen bin und zu dem ich 12 Jahre später zurückkehre. Trotz dieses konkreten Zusammenhangs möchte ich in dieser Arbeit den Produktionsprozess und Suche einer bildlichen Darstellung und Repräsentation verhandeln, die nicht bis in alle Details durchdacht und konzipiert wurden, sondern auf der Suche sind, sich im Produzieren erst formieren und sich auch aus einer materiellen und intuitiven Reflexion ergeben.  

 

Looking Back Forward_Quip Nayr
2018
Berlin/Wien

    Fußnoten

  • 1Gloria Anzaldúa: Making Face, Making Soul. Haciendo Caras: Creative and Critical Perspectives by Feminists of Color. (San Francisco 1990), xxiv.
  • 2At that moment I had already been familiar with Gloria Anzaldúa, but only with her text “La conciencia de la mestiza: Towards a New Consciousness”. This chapter from her book Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (Anzaldúa, Gloria: Borderlands La Frontera: The New Mestiza, San Francisco 2007 [1987] is, in my perception, her most-read text in the German-speaking academic context, specifically within the field of Gender Studies. Many feminists of color such as Fatima El-Tayeb, Maria do Mar Castro Varela, Encarnación Gutiérrez Rodriguez, Jin Haritaworn, and others have criticized the absence of perspectives within German-speaking academia from feminist of color for many years. „Doch wo bleiben die theoretischen Auseinandersetzungen in der Queerbewegung mit dem Schwarzen Feminismus und den Schriften von Migrantinnen? Die Auseinandersetzung mit Konzepten wie dem Gloria Anzaldúas oder Cherrie Moragas ‚Queer of Color‘, die Rassismus, Kolonialismus und Antisemitismus als konstitutive Bestandteile der westlichen Gesellschaft betrachten, findet bis heute kaum Beachtung.“ (Encarnación Gutiérrez Rodríguez; María do Mar Castro Varela: “Queer Politics im Exil und in der Migration”, in: Queering Demokratie: Sexuelle Politiken, (Berlin, 2000). Abridged and edited version by migrazine.at. URL: http://migrazine.at/artikel/queer-politics-im-exil-und-der-migration [accessed March 2, 2019]) This is not the place to further elaborate on the critiques of academics, social movements, associations, and activists in German-speaking countries who are queer/feminists of color. But writing about Gloria Anzaldúa in this context means acknowledging that I am neither the first nor the only person in academia who has written about her and that writing about her and referencing her work is part of a larger political struggle by feminists/lesbians/queers/trans*people and women* of color against a genealogy of a white feminism.
  • 3AnaLouise Keating: “Writing, Politics, and las Lesberadas: Platicando con Gloria Anzaldúa”, in: Chicana Leadership: The Frontiers Reader, edited by Yolanda Flores Niemann Yolanda, Susan H. Armitage, Patricia Hart, and Karen Weathermon. (Lincoln, 2002), 122
  • 4Anzaldúa 1990, xv-xvi. Wenn ich Texte lese, geschieht es meist automatisch, dass ich mir in dieser Sprache Notizen mache, die ich dann anschließend zu einem Text zusammenfüge. In diesem Fall waren meine Notizen auf Deutsch und Englisch. Indem ich die Absätze in den jeweiligen Sprachen belassen habe, in denen sie entstanden sind, möchte ich meinen Denkprozess sichtbar machen, der bei mir (wie auch bei vielen anderen Menschen) in verschiedenen Sprachen stattfindet.
    „Until I can take pride in my language, I cannot take pride in myself.“ (Anzaldúa 1987, 81)
  • 5Anzaldúa 1990: xv.
  • 6Anzaldúa 1990, xvi.
  • 7Interface wird im Deutschen (wenn nicht vom Nähen gesprochen wird) mit Schnittstelle, Oberfläche oder auch Grenzfläche übersetzt. Alle diese Übersetzungen beschreiben sehr gut die Eigenschaften, die Anzaldúa diesem Ort des Dazwischens zuschreibt; es ist ein Ort der Überschneidungen, des Zusammenkommens, ein produktiver oder aktiver Grenzbereich. Im Gegensatz zur Lücke, die eine Leere impliziert, geht es hier um die Notwendigkeit der Existenz dieses Zwischenraums.
  • 8Anzaldúa 1990, xvi.
  • 9Anzaldúa 1990, xxv. Viele Texte von Gloria Anzaldúa sind mehrsprachig und ohne Übersetzungen verfasst. Wie sehr sie dadurch mit akademischen Definitionen von Wissensproduktion brach, zeigt sich auch darin, wie unüblich es ist, wenn einzelne Begriffe einer anderen Sprache nicht übersetzt werden. Ich habe gelernt, diesen Moment des Nichtverstehens einzelner Vokabeln auch als Teil einer Leseerfahrung zu deuten, die uns darauf hinweist, dass nicht alles Wissen immer zugänglich ist oder sein will, dass die Entstehung von Wissen immer auch lokal verortet ist und kontextspezifisches Wissen nicht universell verständlich ist, dass die eigene Perspektive immer auch eine limitierte ist, dass unterschiedliche Sprachkenntnisse (in diesem Fall zum Beispiel des Englischen, Spanischen, Tex-Mex, Spanglish oder auch von Vokabeln aus dem Nahuatl) unterschiedlich viel Aufwand erfordern, sich einem Text anzunähern und dieser Aufwand und diese Differenzen auch mitgelesen werden können.
  • 10Imayna Caceres and I were able to present several artistic positions in dialogue with Anzaldúa’s definition and perception of knowledge production in the exhibition “Back/s Together,” which was presented in 2018 at The Austrian Association of Women Artists (VBKÖ) Vienna
  • 11I do not intend to write a complete list here; rather, I want to express my focus for this article.
  • 12Mit dem Überbegriff Nahua lassen sich verschiedene indigene Gruppen bezeichnen, die Nahuatl sprechen. Ein Großteil lebt auf dem Territorium des heutigen Mexikos.
  • 13Manuel Aguilar-Moreno: Handbook to Life in the Aztec World, (New York, 2006), 145.
  • 14Anzaldúa 1990, xxiv.
  • 15Gloria Anzaldúa: „Haciendo caras, una entrada“, in: The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader, edited by Keating, Ana Lousie and The Gloria E. Anzaldúa Literary
    Trust. (Durham, 2007 [1987]), 124
  • 16Anzaldúa 2009, 121.
  • 17Ebd.
  • 18Anzaldúa 2009, 122 (Herv. i. O.).
  • 19Ebd.
  • 20Siehe zum Beispiel ihr Konzept der „Autohistoria“, Anzaldúa 2009, 319
  • 21Anzaldúa 2009, 122.
  • 22Christa Davis Acampora: “On Unmaking and Remaking, An Introduction (with obvious affection for Gloria Anzaldúa)”, in: Unmaking Race, Remaking Soul: Trasformative Aesthetics and the Practice of Freedom, edited by Davis Acampora, Christa, L. Cotton, Angela, 1–17. (New York, 2007), 2.
  • 23Daniel Blue: Interview with Christa Davis Acampora, in: Nietzsche Circle 2007, S. 18, http://www.nietzschecircle.com/ACAMPORA_INTERVIEW_DB.pdf [accessed February 15, 2019].
  • 24Anzaldúa 1990, xxiv.
  • 25Vgl. Davis Acampora 2007, 5.
  • 26Ebd.
  • 27Ebd.
  • 28Melgarejo Weinandt, Verena: Grimmassen ziehen- Masken aufbrechen- Strukturen freilegen: Fragmentarische Analyse einer Fotocollage. Akademie der bildenen Künste Wien 2016 (unveröffentlichte Diplomarbeit).
/1994/
Index von Ausgabe #8